Advertising

Tributes paid to Wolverhampton teacher who inspired hundreds

By Annabal Bagdi | Wolverhampton | News | Published: | Last Updated:

Tributes have been paid to a former teacher who inspired hundreds of youngsters across the city with his love for learning.

Dr George Frith died aged 67 on December 13

Dr George Frith spent decades trying to transform the lives of his students by sharing his passion for education with young people in Wolverhampton.

He died aged 67 at the city's New Cross Hospital on December 13 following a battle with pneumonia and sepsis.

Ex-pupils and former colleagues are now being invited to unite with Dr Frith's loved ones to commemorate his life at a thanksgiving service next week.

Daughter Lois Frith, now an English teacher, said: "People have been calling up and saying what an impact he had on their life.

"He had quite a difficult start to his life but he always felt it was education that was going to enable him to lift himself out of that.

"He was always there rooting for us to succeed. He always made us feel there was nothing we couldn't do.

"I'm a teacher because I heard him, for so many years, talking about the importance of education and the values he had."

A thanksgiving service will be held for Dr Frith on December 28

Advertising

Dr Frith was born in St. John’s, Antigua, in 1950, but was separated from his siblings when a foster family brought him to England eight years later.

Abused as a child, he initially lived in London before moving to Sutton Coldfield's Princess Alice Orphanage, attending Boldmere Boys’ Grammar School and later living at Erdington's YMCA.

He studied for a Bachelor of Education at Westminster College, Oxford, before coming to Wolverhampton in 1974.

The father-of-two's first teaching stint was at the city's Highfields School, later becoming head of year at Moreton School and gaining a master's degree in history at the University of Wolverhampton.

Advertising

Dr Frith, who lived with wife-of-38-years Pat in Finchfield, went on to become a lecturer at the university in 1986 and was awarded a doctorate in philosophy from the University of Manchester in 1994.

He was also a governor at Wolverhampton Girls' High School and was invited to become a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts in 1995.

Finchfield resident Keith Berry, who was friends with Dr Frith for more than 50 years, said: "I think he would have inspired hundreds of children. He was a model school teacher.

"Everything was given massive attention to detail. He expected the best from everybody."

Dr Frith, who also served as a magistrate, was a keen sportsman - playing for Old Wulfrunians Cricket Club, Goodyear Cricket Club, Codsall Cricket Club and the Commonwealth Cricket Club.

People are invited to join a thanksgiving service in memory of Dr Frith at Beckminster Methodist Church, in Birches Barn Road, at 1.30pm on Thursday.

Annabal Bagdi

By Annabal Bagdi
@AnnabalB_Star

Senior reporter based at head office in Wolverhampton.

Advertising

Top Stories

Advertising

More from the Express & Star

UK & International News